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Speaking of Faith: Domestic Violence Programs and The African American Church

 

The Intersection of Spirituality, Religion, and Intimate Partner Violence in the African American Community explores the role of the Black church in addressing intimate partner violence. The monograph offers information that supports the notion that, because of its standing and influence, the Black Church has an exceptional opportunity to play an active role in addressing intimate partner violence in the African American community. The document concludes with a set of recommendations for domestic violence and sexual assault service providers on how they can incorporate spiritual elements into their programs.

 


The Intersection of Spirituality, Religion, and Intimate Partner Violence in the African American Community

 

Prepared By: Tameka L. Gillum, Ph.D., Dr. Oliver J. Williams

The Intersection of Spirituality, Religion, and Intimate Partner Violence in the African American Community explores the role of the Black church in addressing intimate partner violence. The monograph offers information that supports the notion that, because of its standing and influence, the Black Church has an exceptional opportunity to play an active role in addressing intimate partner violence in the African American community. The document concludes with a set of recommendations for domestic violence and sexual assault service providers on how they can incorporate spiritual elements into their programs.

North Minneapolis Community Violence Report



Prepared By: Dr. Esther J. Jenkins, Dr. William Oliver, Marcus Pope, M.Ed., Dr. Oliver J. Williams

The Northside Minneapolis community struggles with a number of complex issues that affect its residents' ability to thrive. Such struggles include poverty, juvenile delinquency, prostitution, community disenfranchisement, intimate family violence, gang activity, youth and adult crime, and severe and pervasive community violence. Each of these individual issues intersects and compounds the impact of the other. Consequences for communities that face these challenges include ambiguity about the causes of community disorganization and uncertainty about effective responses to resolve these problems and uplift the community.


Ozha Wahbeganniss: Exploring Supervised Visitation & Exchange Services in Native American Communities

 

Prepared By: Lauren J. Litton, JD, I.S.P. Consulting and Oliver J.Williams, Ph.D. Executive Director, Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community

Supervised visitation and exchange services for families who have experienced intimate partner violence is a needed resource for tribal communities. This report highlights recommendations stemming from discussion groups held with Native American professionals and consumers about how these services can be created in a way that both meets the needs of families and is valued by the community.

Concepts in Creating Culturally Responsive Services for Supervised Visitation Centers

 

Prepared By: Dr. Oliver J. Williams

This report was developed to assist Office on Violence Against Women Supervised Visitation Center (SVC) and Safe Exchange program grantees in examining how they serve culturally diverse populations. A major goal of this report is to encourage Supervised Visitation grantees to reflect on the good work they already do and to consider how they can enhance their efforts to support diverse populations in the context of court-referred supervised visitation when domestic violence is an issue.


SRI Roundtable Brief

 

 

During the initial phase of the Safe Return Initiative, IDVAAC in partnership with the Vera Institute of Justice conducted a roundtable discussion with representatives from re-entry programs in Nashville, Tennessee; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Portland, Oregon. These programs are unique because of their attention to the safety needs of women in relationships with men in prison and on parole. This report summarizes these sites' descriptions of their work, what they perceive as challenges and what they believe can enhance their efforts.

Safe Return: Phase 1 Report 2003-2005

 

 

Prepared By: Dr. Oliver J. Williams

Most efforts to address re-entry have focused on the influence of unemployment, substance abuse, and inadequate housing on prisoners' post-release success. To date, limited attention has been given to the connection between domestic violence and criminal recidivism. This report highlights Safe Return Initiative training efforts in Minnesota to address the important, yet understudied intersection of prisoner re-entry and domestic violence.


Domestic Violence & Culturally diverse Communities in Detroit

 

Prepared By: Creasie Finney Hairston and William Oliver

This report recommends ways to address domestic violence when African American women are in intimate relationships with African American men who are in prison or on parole. The report draws on discussion groups of men and women dealing with reentry who were asked how similarly situated people experience and manage conflict with their partners. Through these discussions, Safe Return found that some women believe the experience of imprisonment negatively influences some men's behavior as husbands and fathers after release; men reported that some similarly situated men try to control their intimate partners while inside prison or consider violence to be an appropriate response to infidelity or perceived slights. The recommendations include emphasizing cultural competence in programming and providing institutional support to intimate partners and their children who are preparing for an incarcerated person's return, whether or not they choose to reunify with returning prisoners.

Safe Return: Working Toward Preventing Domestic Violence When Men Return From Prison

 

Prepared By: Mike Bobbitt, Robin Campbell, and Gloria L. Tate

Corrections and parole officials and domestic violence advocates met in two roundtable discussions to examine ways to address intimate partner violence when men return from prison. This report summarizes the practices and key challenges identified in those meetings and addresses themes such as institutional resistance to addressing domestic violence, ways to involve intimate partners-including women who may have been victims of domestic violence-in reentry planning, and the value of cultural competence and programming that considers race. Participants expressed a need for training and ongoing dialogue between criminal justice staff and domestic violence advocates, and noted the value of including the perspectives of former victims to improve practice.


Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Greenville, North Carolina 2006

Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Seattle, Washington 2004


Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Birmingham, AL Report 2003

Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Detroit, MI Report 2003


Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Minneapolis, MN Report 2003

Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

San Francisco/Oakland, CA Report 2002


Community Insights on Domestic Violence among African Americans

Memphis, TN Report 2001